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Bangladesh

 
 

heading foldHow we are helping

2012/13 Expenditure

$97.3 million

2013/14 Proposed Expenditure

$87.3 million

 

Expenditure is total official development assistance inclusive of DFAT’s bilateral program, flows from DFAT regional and global programs and other government departments.

Implementation of the revised 2013-14 budget is currently under discussion with partner governments and organisations.

 

 

Australia’s aid to Bangladesh aims to increase access to quality health and education services for marginalised groups, especially women and children. It also aims to reduce poverty levels and vulnerability to economic and natural shocks, as well as increase the ability of marginalised groups to demand quality services and assert their rights.

Australia has invested $281.7 million on Bangladesh in the previous three years. Some of the key results include:

  • helping skilled birth attendants to assist in an additional 125,000 births and 231,000 women receive medical care for pregnancy-related complications.
  • helping 262,000 children to complete pre-primary school and 114,000 complete primary school, as well as training almost 60,000 primary school teachers.
  • assisting 600,000 women to lift their families out of extreme poverty and improved economic opportunities for 85,600 extremely poor families.

More results can be viewed under the ‘See our results’ tab above.

Australia expects to provide $97.3 million in development assistance to Bangladesh in 2012–13. We will:

  • help skilled birth attendants to attend an additional 84,800 births
  • help 89,000 children to complete pre-primary school and 102,000 children complete primary school
  • contribute to 88,000 women receiving cash, assets and skills training to lift their families out of extreme poverty
  • support the Government of Bangladesh to expand its local disaster risk management activities to 32 vulnerable districts.

More on expected outcomes can be viewed under the ‘See our results’ tab above.

 

Health

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Contributed to an 11 per cent annual decrease in maternal mortality between 2009 and 2011 in four districts (double the average decrease nationally).
  • Helped skilled birth attendants assist in an additional 125,000 births and 231,000 women receive medical care for pregnancy-related complications.
  • 480,000 children received vaccinations.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Help skilled birth attendants attend an additional 84,800 births.
  • Contribute to a 10 per cent decrease in maternal mortality in target districts in 2012-13.

Read more on health

Education

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Helped 262,000 children complete pre-primary school and 114,000 complete primary school.
  • 9,701 children are now able to access school because of changes to make schools accessible to children with disabilities.
  • Helped train almost 60,000 primary school teachers (including 7,900 non-formal primary school teachers).
  • 413 people have been given scholarships for tertiary education in Australia from 2007 to 2011.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Help 89,000 children complete pre-primary school and 102,000 children complete primary school (at least 50 per cent girls) in 2012-13.
  • 62 students will begin long-term study in Australia in 2013, together with 32 students commencing short-term awards.
  • Annual targets for the new five-year primary education program have not been set, but agreed indicators include:
    • more teachers with professional qualification
    • gender parity in enrolment
    • more classrooms that are in good condition
    • decreased dropout rates.

Read more on education

Economic development

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Helped 600,000 females lift their families out of extreme poverty between, through asset transfers, training and a cash stipend.
  • Helped improve economic opportunities for 85,600 extreme-poor families who received livestock assets, a daily stipend and livelihoods skills.
  • Helped provide 433,500 person days of work for 14,300 people to help prevent food insecurity during lean agricultural seasons.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Contribute to 88,000 females receiving cash, assets and skills training to lift their families out of extreme poverty.
  • District and local governments will be helped to revise Risk Reduction Action Plans to include climate change impacts.

Read more on economic development

Humanitarian

Results to 30 June 2012

  • 6,500 volunteers recruited, trained and equipped to rapidly expand the coverage of the Government of Bangladesh’s Cyclone Preparedness Programme.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Help the Government of Bangladesh to expand its local disaster risk management activities to 32 vulnerable districts.

Read more on humanitarian

Research overview

Good research can lead to positive change for the world's poorest by enhancing the design and implementation of development policies and programs. That's why we are committed to an innovative research portfolio and funds research, including through:

  • competitive funding mechanisms (such as the Australian Development Research Awards Scheme)
  • research partnerships with different Australian, international and developing country research institutions
  • commissioning research to address a specific question or clearly defined research gap
  • one-off research grants, when an existing program of research is relevant to the Australian aid program.

More information on how we fund research

Research funded by Australian Aid targets some of Bangladesh’s most important development challenges, such as maternal and child health, education and climate change. Some of the highlights of this research are listed below.

Australia-SAARC Agricultural Research and Training Project

This project promotes food security through improved water productivity in the South Asian countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Bhutan. Partnering with the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), it will fund in-country research and trials, including targeting gender-inequality in the agricultural sector, and build research capacity in these countries through training researchers in analysis and modelling techniques.

More information is available on the ACIAR [external link] website.

Core support to International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Australia’s support for the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) funds research aligned to the Centre's strategic plan, including support for health systems strengthening, research on women's and child health and disease surveillance to improve disease management. Australia is one of five donors providing core funding to support the Centre's operational needs, capacity building, advocacy and policy development.

More information is available on the ICDDR,B [external link] website.

From microfinance to rural credit: evidence from a panel survey and field experiments in Bangladesh

This research, conducted by the University of Sydney, explores the role that the interaction between formal and informal rural credit providers can play in improving access to finance and incomes for rural populations in Bangladesh. The study uses randomised field experiments to evaluate alternative microfinance mechanisms that can be used to extend credit to currently excluded rural households.

Managing community impacts of climate change in India and Bangladesh

This Monash University projects aims to identify measures to improve community resilience and sustainable livelihood systems in the Gangetic Basin (India and Bangladesh) in response to climate change. A comparative analysis of case study communities will be undertaken, and particular attention will be paid to the role of women and children in vulnerable communities, relative to likely climate impacts.

More information is available on the Monash University [external link] website.

Improvement of maternal and neonatal health by operationalising an integrated evidence-based intervention package through strengthening of health system in Bangladesh

In partnership with the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, this Australian Development Research Award-supported project aims to test the effectiveness of an integrated evidence-based intervention in a target district to increase skilled birth attendance, decrease neonatal mortality, increase met need for obstetric care and to improve quality of care.

More information is available on the ICDDR,B [external link] website.

International Drowning Research Centre, Bangladesh

This funding to the Royal Life Saving Society established an International Drowning Research Centre, and implemented a program of operational research focused on developing a drowning prevention strategy for application in Bangladesh and countries with similar social, cultural and risk environments.

More information is available on the Global Drowning Fund Australia [external link] website.

 
 

heading foldWhy we give aid

quote

Bangladesh is one of the poorest and most densely populated countries in the world. It is situated on a low-lying delta, making its people vulnerable to extreme weather events and flooding. Access to government services is uneven. Australia's support focuses on helping the poorest citizens to lift themselves out of poverty, access basic services and respond to the challenges of climate change.

Find out more about why we give aid to Bangladesh

 
 

heading foldHow we give aid

Australia works with trusted partners in Bangladesh to reduce poverty levels and improve service delivery in education, maternal and child health, social protection, water and sanitation and climate change.

Find out more about how we give aid to Bangladesh

Read the Australia–Bangladesh Aid Program Strategy (2012–16)

 
 

heading foldProgress Against MDGs

  • Eradicate extreme hunger & poverty
  • Achieve universal primary education
  • Promote gender equality and empower women
  • Reduce child mortality
  • Improve maternal health
  • Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
  • Ensure environmental sustainability

Demographic and development statistics for Bangladesh

 
 

Last reviewed: 18 January, 2014