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Sri Lanka

 
 

heading foldHow we are helping

2012/13 Expenditure

$42.6 million

2013/14 Proposed Expenditure

$39.7 million

 

Expenditure is total official development assistance inclusive of DFAT’s bilateral program, flows from DFAT regional and global programs and other government departments.

Implementation of the revised 2013-14 budget is currently under discussion with partner governments and organisations.

 

The main objectives for Australian aid to Sri Lanka are to:

  • rebuild post-conflict communities and assist lagging regions throughout the nation
  • support Sri Lankan Government policies and programs to promote inclusive growth and improved service delivery at a national and sub-national level.

Australian aid primarily focuses on health, education and economic development—with governance a cross-cutting theme for all aid in Sri Lanka. Our aid is delivered through trusted and effective partners, including multilateral organisations (such as the World Bank), United Nations agencies (such as UN Habitat), and non-government organisations (such as World Vision).

Australia has invested $144.6 million on Sri Lanka in the previous three years. Some of the key results include:

  • 6,088 people living on tea estates receiving safe drinking water and improved sanitation facilities
  • providing training for more than 24,000 teachers and school officials in contemporary, interactive approaches to education
  • providing almost 4,000 female-headed households with training, loans and assets to re-establish livelihoods.

More results can be viewed under the ‘See our results’ tab above.

Australia expects to provide $42.6 million in development assistance to Sri Lanka in 2012–13. We will:

  • work with the Sri Lankan Government to improve the quality of primary and secondary education and reduce regional disparities in achievement
  • provide around 30 long-term scholarships in 2013 in subject areas such as education, health, environment and governance and 61 short-term awards
  • double the incomes of more than 5,000 people living in rural areas and protect more than 4,000 acres of forest.

More on expected outcomes can be viewed under the ‘See our results’ tab above.

Health

Results to 30 June 2012

  • 6,088 people living on tea estates received safe drinking water and improved sanitation facilities.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Approximately 150 schools will receive hygiene education and water and sanitation facilities to national standards.

Read more on health

Education

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Identified out-of-school children across four provinces and enrolled 2,350 children, who had previously dropped out.
  • Provided training for more than 24,000 teachers and school officials in contemporary, interactive approaches to education.
  • In 2012, 28 long-term and 54 short-term scholarships to Sri Lankan Government officials to build a better public service.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Work with the Sri Lankan Government to improve the quality of primary and secondary education and reduce regional disparities in achievement.
  • Provide around 30 long-term scholarships in 2013 in subject areas such as education, health, environment and governance and
  • 19 short-term awards.

Read more on education

Economic development

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Provided almost 4,000 female-headed households with training, loans and assets to re-establish livelihoods.
  • Constructed vital fishing infrastructure for around 700 fishing families to help them increase earnings.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Double the incomes of more than 5,000 people living in rural areas and protect more than 4,000 acres of forest.
  • Improve the incomes of 3,606 fishing families by building productive infrastructure.

Read more on economic development

Governance

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Increased local government revenue through improved methods of tax collection and service delivery (for example helping to collect around $450,000 in unpaid taxes).
  • 744 public servants trained in English, social development and financial management.
  • Supported public-private partnerships in 19 localities around Sri Lanka to strengthen local governance and stimulate the private sector.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Improve local government revenue collection, such as through supporting the reassessment of property values.
  • Design and implement a pilot ‘Citizen Report Card’ in two locations to inform local authorities about public satisfaction.

Read more on governance

Humanitarian

Results to 30 June 2012

  • Provided 10,000 tons of food aid to displaced people.
  • Provided cash grants for around 79,000 displaced families.
  • Provided mine risk education, which has contributed to a fall in the number of mine related casualties and injuries from 47 in 2010 to 27 in 2011.

Commitments 2012-2013

  • Approximately 4,000 permanent houses will be repaired or reconstructed.
  • Strengthen coordination capacity in the national Sri Lanka Disaster Management and regional disaster management organisations in the Northern and Eastern Provinces.

Read more on humanitarian

Research overview

Good research can lead to positive change for the world's poorest by enhancing the design and implementation of development policies and programs. That's why we are committed to an innovative research portfolio and funds research, including through:

  • competitive funding mechanisms (such as the Australian Development Research Awards Scheme)
  • research partnerships with different Australian, international and developing country research institutions
  • commissioning research to address a specific question or clearly defined research gap
  • one-off research grants, when an existing program of research is relevant to the Australian aid program.

More information on how we fund research

Research funded by Australian Aid specifically targets some of Sri Lanka’s development challenges. Some of the highlights of this research are listed below.

Gender, status and empowerment: A study among women who work in Sri Lanka's export processing zones

This study of 2500 women factory workers in Sri Lanka’s export processing zones traced the impact of formal employment on women's status. Previous studies have found that female factory workers in Sri Lanka face significant societal and community disempowerment as a result of their employment. This study was funded by Australian Aid and undertaken by researchers at Edith Cowan University.

The study found that, along with economic empowerment and improvements in knowledge and skills, women’s decision making power increased in the home and, in some cases, in the workplace. Their social empowerment has also been improved with increased mobility and acceptance from their family and community. However, there are limited opportunities for women to advance in these occupations, the work is repetitive and the social stigma attached to women’s participation in factory employment remains, despite efforts by the government, NGOS and unions to reinforce the contribution of these women to the economy.

This study showed that remittances of women factory workers have contributed significantly to the alleviation of poverty in Sri Lanka. Wider communication of the contribution of these women to the economy will contribute to combatting the negative portrayal of these workers in Sri Lanka.

Read the full report

 
 

heading foldWhy we give aid

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Australia has good bilateral relations with Sri Lanka, underpinned by trade and investment flows, education, immigration, strong people-to-people links and development cooperation.

Australia’s aid to Sri Lanka is targeted at addressing the development challenges facing the country after a 26 year civil conflict, which ended in 2009.

While poverty is on the decline overall, it remains entrenched in areas across the country, particularly the conflict-affected north and east.

Find out more about why we give aid to Sri Lanka

 
 

heading foldHow we give aid

Australia’s aid to Sri Lanka supports practical measures to directly help disadvantaged communities find work, start businesses or restart farming or fishing activities. We also support reforms to national and local government policies and programs to ensure economic growth is inclusive and essential services are improved.

Australian aid to Sri Lanka is delivered through trusted and effective organisations like the World Bank, United Nations and reputable non-government organisations (such as World Vision).

Find out more about how we give aid to Sri Lanka

Read the Australia - Sri Lanka aid program strategy 2012-16

 
 

heading foldProgress Against MDGs

  • Eradicate extreme hunger & poverty
  • Achieve universal primary education
  • Promote gender equality and empower women
  • Reduce child mortality
  • Improve maternal health
  • Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
  • Ensure environmental sustainability

Demographic and development statistics for Sri Lanka

 
 

Last reviewed: 18 January, 2014