Navigate Up
Sign In

Research

 
 

heading foldHow we are helping

Our funding for 2011/12

$133 million

Implementation of the revised 2013-14 budget is currently under discussion with partner governments and organisations.

 

The Australian Aid's research program is helping to improve the quality and effectiveness of Australian aid in developing countries. Practical research helps inform where and how our own and our partners’ resources can most effectively and efficiently be deployed. Guided by the Research Strategy 2012–16, we fund many different types of research to answer the wide range of challenges to development in our partner countries, to assist us to monitor development impacts, and to better target programs.

Health

Results 2011–12

  • Government planning for better maternal and child health in Bangladesh was informed by reliable, up-to-date maternal health data generated through the second Bangladesh Maternal Mortality and Health Service Survey conducted by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B).
  • Better health systems and policies in the Asia Pacific region were supported through research on births and deaths registration systems together with the provision of guidelines, resource kits and training for Asia Pacific countries to assess, extract and use their own health data. 
  • More people have access to affordable healthcare in Indonesia, following research into barriers to health services in the not-for-profit hospital sector, conducted by the Australian-funded Health Policy and Health Finance knowledge hub.

More about health

Education

Results 2011–12

  • The Government of Solomon Islands adopted a National Policy on Eliminating Violence Against Women and associated action plan using the evidence developed through the ‘The Solomon Islands Family Health and Safety Study: A Study on Violence against Women and Children’, funded by the department. This research is also supporting reform of the Penal Code, undertaken by the Solomon Islands Law Reform Commission.
  • The national kindergarten to Year 12 school curriculum in the Philippines was improved to reflect international standards through comparative research on curriculum content, structure, sequence, and assessment from around the Asia Pacific region. This has stimulated Government demand for further research to improve the quality of education.

More about education

Economic development

Results 2011–12

Our research partnership with ACIAR has:

  • supported yield increases of more than 50 per cent, through research into the use of disease-resistant maize in Afghanistan. Total production value is expected to rise by more than $100 million.
  • improved farmers’ incomes by nearly 50 cents per day through research into better farm management systems, irrigation methods and milk production in Central Punjab, as part of the Agricultural Sectoral Linkages Program in Pakistan.
  • secured access for over 9000 men and women farmers to better seed varieties, and established 280 community seed production groups in 2011, through the Seeds of Life research project in East Timor. Around 21,000 farmers are now growing at least one Seed of Life variety developed at local research farms, increasing yields by between 23 and 80 per cent.
Australian-funded research has helped reduce farmers’ exposure to cassava toxicity in Mozambique through investigation of the effects of climate change on the staple crop. The development of predictive mechanisms and distribution of toxicity testing kits are now supporting farmers to choose the least toxic cultivars during seasons of drought.

More about economic development

Governance

Results 2011–12

  • Research showing unequal access to justice resulted in Indonesian family courts receiving budget increases, providing access to the courts to four times the number of people living in remote areas of Indonesia.

More about governance

Humanitarian

Results 2011–12

  • A real-time earthquake estimation system was developed through research by the Australia–Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction. This tool informed Indonesian disaster management authorities within hours of a massive earthquake in April 2012 that there would not be significant damage or casualties. This thereby reduced the need for unnecessary mobilisation of emergency relief services.

More about humanitarian

 

Estimated Official Development Assistance 2011–12

Priority Spend ($ million)
Total $133 million
Country programs 86.7
Sector/Thematic programs 33.9
Global programs 7.9
Research section 4.5

Historical funding

Graph of the Official Development Assistance to Research. 

Exact values are provided below.
View a larger version

The graph above shows historical Australian Aid research funding ($ millions).

The exact values are as follows:

  • 2011–12
    $133 million
  • 2010–11
    $106 million
  • 2009–10
    $101 million
  • 2008–09
    $67 million

Research overview

Most of Australian aid research funding is provided through country programs and sector or thematic programs, with a smaller share through global programs and through our research section. This decentralised approach ensures our portfolio of activity has close links to program design and implementation. The research section provides advice and guidance to program areas on research activities, and oversees our centrally-managed research activities such as the Australian Development Research Awards Scheme (ADRAS). Information and outputs related to research activities supported by our country programs and sector or thematic programs can be found on the relevant country or sector pages on this website.

Australian Development Research Awards Scheme

The Australian Development Research Awards Scheme is a key component of the Research Strategy 2012–2016, the purpose of which is to improve the quality and effectiveness of Australian aid in developing countries. We promote fairness, transparency and value for money from our research investment including through the use of competitive mechanisms to fund research. The scheme supports high quality, innovative research that informs policy development. Since 2007 the scheme has supported 129 primary research grants and 17 systematic reviews of development research.

Research material and findings produced through the scheme's projects, including journal articles, conference papers and policy briefs, can be accessed on the individual development priorities pages at the left of this page. Information on research activities overseen by other areas including country or sector or thematic programs can be found on the relevant pages.

Research outputs

The department funds research to improve the quality and effectiveness of Australian aid in developing countries. Practical research helps inform where and how our own and our partners’ resources can most effectively and efficiently be deployed.

We fund many different types of research to answer the wide range of challenges to development in our partner countries, to assist us to monitor development impacts, or to better target programs. The development priorities pages listed in the left hand navigation column feature outputs of research activities supported through the Australian Development Research Awards Scheme. Information and outputs related to research activities supported by our country programs and sector or thematic programs can be found on the relevant country or sector pages on this website.

The Australian Development Research Awards Scheme (ADRAS) is a key component of the Research Strategy 2012–2016, the purpose of which is to improve the quality and effectiveness of Australian aid in developing countries. We promote fairness, transparency and value for money from our research investment including through the use of competitive mechanisms to fund research. The ADRAS is designed to attract high quality, innovative research that informs policy development.

 
 

heading foldWhy we give aid

quote

Practical research helps to inform where and how our own and our partners’ resources can most effectively and efficiently be deployed. A robust and relevant knowledge base provides the evidence we need for sound development policies and programs. The department funds many different types of research to answer a wide range of development challenges in our partner countries, to assist us to monitor development impact, and to better target programs.

Find out more about why we give aid for research

 
 

heading foldHow we give aid

The department funds research through partnerships with Australian, international and developing country institutes, competitive grant schemes, direct grants, and by commissioning research. Most of our research funding is provided through country programs and sector or thematic programs, with a smaller share through global programs and through our research section. This decentralised approach ensures our portfolio of activity has close links to program design and implementation. We fund research that will provide the best available evidence on key themes at a global, regional and local level.

Find out more about how we give aid for research

 
 
 

Last reviewed: 1 November, 2013